Tag Archives: Sherry Turkle

Pecha Kucha Reflection

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When we were first assigned the Pecha Kucha, it was something that interested me. I had never heard of anything like it before and the name just pulled you in. However I couldn’t say it quite right at first, not that I can always say it right now but I have to say I’ve gotten better a lot better. Even though I looked forward to the Pecha Kucha going into it, as it came to crunch time, the Pecha Kucha was an assignment that began to intimidated me. As I started planning my slides and the material that I wanted to cover, I thought that there was absolutely no way that I could provide the information that I needed to in the short amount of time of 1 minute and 20 seconds, especially since there was only 20 seconds per slide. This intimidation lasted all the way until I was done giving my presentation, but watching others and completing mine, it was really cool watching how they all came together and the interesting information that they provided as well.

A Walk Through A Slide: It is hard to just pick one slide to walk through and deem most important because all of them come together to make the information that I shared in our Pecha Kucha important. However, since I have to choose, I think the strongest slide I made in my part of our group’s Pecha Kucha presentation was my second slide. During this slide, I used a quote from Sherry Turkle that she had said in her “I Am We” article. The full quote read, “There are many Sherry Turkles. There is the “French Sherry,” who studied poststructuralism in Paris in the 1960s. There is Turkle the social scientist, trained in anthropology, personality psychology, and sociology. There is Dr. Turkle, the clinical psychologist. There is Sherry Turkle the writer of books – Psychoanalytic Politics (Basic Books, 1978) and The Second Self: Computers and the Human Spirit (Simon & Schuster, 1984). There is Sherry the professor, who has mentored MIT students for nearly 20 years. And there is the cyberspace explorer, the woman who might log on as a man, or as another woman, or as, simply, ST.”

After reading this quote in the article, it immediately stuck with me. It was just a powerful example to me that kind made me think things and question them further on the topic of internet identity. As soon as my group discussed our topic and what each of us going to focus on within our topic of freedom and I was given freedom of identity, I knew that I had to use that quote. Of course, when it came down to fitting it in with all of the other information that I was trying to say to in the short minute and twenty seconds that we had to present, I had to cut it down. But even taking some of the beginning examples out and just using a few still give it the effect visual that I was hoping to create with it. For a visual on this slide, I chose a picture that I thought went along with this quote due to the last sentence of the quote reads, “And there is the cyberspace explorer, the woman who might log on as a man, or as another woman, or as, simply, ST.” Because there could be so many different versions of someone hiding behind the mask of the internet I chose a middle aged man hiding behind a white face-less mask. This emphasizes the man part of the quote and the hidden identity.

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What I Learned About My Blog Topic: When we picked topics in the beginning of the module and my group was responsible for the topic of “Freedom”, I knew I was going to learn a lot. Originally going into the topic and assigned blogging, my mind set was that everyone should have their Freedom. I mean this is America right? Land of the free? So if we have so much freedom of everything else, why shouldn’t we have freedom on the internet? But as it came to the end of the module and time for the Pecha Kucha assignment, my views changed completely. Although I previously believed that every internet user deserved to have their freedom when logging on, I’m starting to think slightly differently. After many of the articles that we read assigned for class and those I researched myself with the help of the internet, I realized that more people than I realized abuse this freedom. Many use freedom of identity on the internet as shield or a mask to create a false identity and do more harm then good in the process. Things such as lying in online relationships, social media networks to lore people in, you never know who you are really talking to. All of the time that I have been using the internet I have been so trusting in who I talk to because I never realized that I shouldn’t be. What if the boy that started messaging me on Facebook from Michigan isn’t really my age? Or doesn’t really play soccer? Or what if he isn’t really a boy? This topic has made me realize that I really need to be a lot more careful of who I talk and interact with on the internet. Because the truth is that one the internet there is no truth. A lot of it is lies that people create, so you have to be cautious in your choices when using the internet, especially social media sites. I also learned that my topic not only stands own its own as an issue on the internet, but ties into the other group’s topics as well. After watching everyone’s Pecha Kucha presentations and reading their blogs I realized that all of our topics rely on one another. Freedom on the internet can give users anonymity and the ability to create the person they want. But when people create this “person” on the internet they should have a sense of etiquette in the decisions that they make in this process and with the ways that they communicate. In result, this will create the safety that is needed for internet users.

All in all I learned a whole lot about the using the internet and virtual technologies in the means of writing and communication. This class really opened my eyes to many new things that the internet has in store for writing and the issues that it produces as well.

Who Do You Want To Be?: The Masks Behind Technology.

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Who do you want to be? It doesn’t matter who you are right now, what you look like, where you live, age, interests, talents, likes, dislikes. All of the things that right now define who you are can be wiped clean with the click of just a button. Did you ever think this would be possible? To completely re-create who we are to people and instantly become who we want to be? The internet has made this option so easily available for us today and the truth is that even though you may want to believe that most people are being truthful, some of them are not.

In her article “Who Am We”, Sherry Turkle talks about how the computer has went from being introduced to a college classroom as a “giant calculator” to altering our minds, ideas, and even who we are into something different. When it was first developed the computer was strictly technical and known for calculating purposes only. But, today the computer and the internet have greatly evolved to allow us to branch out to people with so many different forms of communication that it could make your head spin. Between Twitter, Facebook, Blogging sites, and much more, we have so many options to choose from. It is crazy to think that when you enter a social media site such as these that we do not have to be who we are. We can enter a totally different image of ourselves, a different personality, a different persona and fool people into thinking that we are someone that we are not. It is like we are creating our own character that we just dreamed up.

Yes, in a way this can be a great thing, we can be who we always wanted. And in some cases this can be innocent. Pretending that you played a certain sport or liked a certain band that would give you a different image or dynamic, fine. But in other cases, these lies are not quite as innocent. Due to these masked identities that we create, the world of the internet can be a scary and unexpected place. You never know if you are really talking to a boy your age that goes to Temple University or if you are actually communicating with a 40 year old man that gets a kick out of talking to young girls. Being able to create these different sides of ourselves can at times be harmless, but you still have to be cautious for the times that they are not. Next time you are talking to someone on the internet be sure you know who they really are, not someone you think they might be.

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My name is Jack. But only on Facebook : Identity on the Internet

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If I told you today, my name is Jack and I am a 35 year old man from Jacksonville, North Carolina, would you believe me?  stranger

Well , in fact, my name is not Jack, I am not  a man, I am not from North Carolina, and I am a college junior. Scary isn’t it? That I can tell you I am anyone I want, from anywhere in the world I want, and you just have to take my word for it. The internet is free and so is this country. Who has the right to tell me I can’t lie?

Sherry Turkle explores this phenomenon in her article, ” Who Am We” (http://www.wired.com/wired/archive/4.01/turkle.html) . As she describes it, “life on the screen permits us to “project ourselves into our own dramas, dramas in which we are producer, director, and star…. Computer screens are the new location for our fantasies, both erotic and intellectual. We are using life on computer screens to become comfortable with new ways of thinking about evolution, relationships, sexuality, politics, and identity.”

In other words, the internet is not real life . Maybe for some of us it is. Maybe you go on Facebook and Twitter simply to share thoughts about your  daily life, thoughts and ideas. But what if your life is too boring? What if you have tons of ideas bottled in your head that are far too inappropriate for your grandmother to see on your profile? The internet, and freedom, tells us it is OK to make something, or someone else up instead. If you don’t feel like being you today, and your boss made you really mad, you can sign up on twitter and make an anonymous account bashing your job.  No one is going to do an identity check when you sign up on social networking sites, so why not?

 Turkle adds, “That the Internet links millions of people in new spaces that are changing the way we think and the way we form our communities. That we are moving from “a modernist culture of calculation ” . We used to form our communities based on people around us, that had similar interests and desires. Doing that on the internet, could lead you to an entirely different community, with people lying about what they do, and who they are.

People lying about their identity has become an overwhelmingly popular thing to do. It used to be believed that predators would be the only ones doing it, because it was wrong. Now teenagers do it to get dates.

Freedom allows us to be whoever we want to be. Home, in school, or online. But is it OK to be three different people? In case you still don’t believe this happens, check out that trailer for  MTV’s reality show Catfish.

This is real life.